Month: July 2017

Norwich Eye reviews A Murder is Announced

Miss Marple is at the Theatre Royal in Norwich this week as ‘A Murder is Announced’ in the newspaper to take place that evening in the house of Letitia Blacklock (Janet Dibley).   Set in the drawing room of an early Victorian house in Chipping Cleghorn during October 1950, the cosy feeling of the sitting room extended into the toasty auditorium. But this is an Agatha Christie tale of more than one murder, deception, and deceit – the things people will do to get hold of or keep someone’s money!   Over the course of the following few days the...

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Norwich Eye review – Border Control by Hack Theatre at the NAC

Trying to get to the Arts Centre for 6pm was a bit of a trial. With traffic on the remaining city roads backed up and solid it was difficult to weave through even on my bike. Yet such trivial irritations are set firmly in context by the challenge facing the young couple at the heart of this drama.  Yasmine Frost (Tamanna Rahman) is applying for permission to stay in the U.K.  Originally from Morocco, she has been studying at UEA, and has fallen in love with fellow student Edward Frost (Joe Jones). They have married recently. We only see...

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Gilbert and Sullivan are back in Norwich!

  Cast of colourful characters set to entertain THE NATIONAL GILBERT & SULLIVAN OPERA COMPANY – September 14-16, 2017   The National Gilbert & Sullivan Company is all set to return to Norwich Theatre Royal this September with colourful characters such as the ‘very model of a modern Major-General’ in the Pirates of Penzance, Yum-Yum from The Mikado and First Lord of the Admiralty Sir Joseph Porter in HMS Pinafore. The comic operatic works of librettist W.S. Gilbert and composer Arthur Sullivan proved popular with Norfolk audiences when the company visited last September, and while trends and tastes may...

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Norwich Eye review – Come Yew In by The Common Lot

Director Simon Floyd set himself and his cast an ambitious challenge with this production which brings to life the human stories of migrants in Norwich over the centuries. In a country dominated by a tabloid agenda of division and distrust it is timely to be reminded just how our contemporary society is shaped by years of migration and mixing, and basing the play on the stories of our Norwich community is a stroke of genius. A series of separate anecdotes, sketches and songs could be rather messy, but this ensemble is brought together by the peroration of Professor Kirby-Bedon,...

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